Crow Not Crow by Jane Yolen and Adam Stemple

Rating: 5 out of 5.

My Thoughts:

What I Loved: This book focuses on bird watching with a daughter and father. I loved that this past-time is clearly something that the father and daughter get to do together. Bird watching was a new concept to my daughter and she enjoyed the daughter learning from her father…Crow? Not Crow.

How I Felt: Bird watching is not something that my family spends time doing, so I wasn’t sure how my daughter would react to the book. She was fully invested, though! The writing was engaging and had my daughter inspecting each bird on the page to see the differences described by the daughter and father. The illustrations were perfect, allowing for that long-look to be rewarded by seeing those differences.

To Read or Not To Read: This is a great book for any child! It is easy to understand and follow and even has a section in the back to show real images of the different birds as well as a little blurb about each one. This would be a great classroom book!

What’s This Book About Anyway?

A father and his daughter go out on their first bird watching adventure. She guesses at the types of birds saying “Crow?”. The Father will then respond with “Not Crow” and explain the differences in the birds. It is a great introduction to bird watching for a child. The child can be interactive during the reading by also looking for the differences!

Where To Find This Book:

Amazon

Goodreads

Footnotes:

I received a copy of this advanced reader’s copy for free. I am leaving my review voluntarily.

All Amazon links on SheJustLovesBooks are affiliate links and I receive a small percentage of sales from the use of them. If you fall in love with a book because of my review and you want to buy, I would greatly appreciate the use of the link on my page.

#shejustlovesbooks #bookreview #bookblog #crownotcrow #kidslit #kidsbooks #childrensbooks #kidsbook #childrensbook #janeyolen #adamstemple

Bears Make the Best Writing Buddies by Carmen Oliver

Rating: 4 out of 5.

My Thoughts:

What I Loved: The idea of helping children understand how to write something is great. I loved the tips that are given in this book and I loved the support that the bear can give to the child trying to write.

How I Felt: Bears Make the Best Writing Buddy is a book marketed to children, and yet I felt that it was really for an adult writer. It spoke of writer’s block, which I don’t think that a young child understands and deals with. The book had a cute concept with the bear being the support for the writer, but I’m just not sure how helpful it is for a child. The book overall kept my daughter interested however, and she loved the illustrations. This is the third book in a series of “Bears Make the Best…” and I would like to check out the other books.

Bears Make the Best Math Buddies by Carmen Oliver

Adelaide and Bear have tackled reading together, and now they are tackling math. Adelaide stands up for her best friend and his many talents, but will she convince her teacher to let Bear be her math buddy?

Amazon * Goodreads

Bears Make the Best Reading Buddies by Carmen Oliver

All the students in the class are assigned reading buddies. Except for Adelaide. She already has one. A bear! And Adelaide is quite persuasive as she explains to her language arts teacher, Mrs. Fitz-Pea, and the reader, that bears really do make the best reading buddies. They sniff out good books. Their claws are just right for turning pages.

Amazon * Goodreads

To Read or Not To Read: This is a good book for schools. I think that a teacher working on a writing segment would enjoy reading this to the class. It would get them excited to write.

What’s This Book About Anyway?

A young boy is struggling to write his story and a friend introduces him to a bear. She explains all the reasons that bears are the best writing buddies, giving the boy ideas on how to solve writing problems along the way.

Where To Find This Book:

Bears Make the Best Writing Buddies will be published on January 1, 2020.

Amazon Goodreads

Footnotes:

I received a copy of this advanced reader’s copy for free. I am leaving my review voluntarily.

All Amazon links on SheJustLovesBooks are affiliate links and I receive a small percentage of sales from the use of them. If you fall in love with a book because of my review and you want to buy, I would greatly appreciate the use of the link on my page.

#shejustlovesbooks #bookreview #bookblog #bearsmakethebest #bearsmakethebestwritingbuddies #carmenoliver #kidslit #kidsbooks #childrensbooks #netgalley

Bathing Kitty: and Other Mischievous Poems by L.W. Lewis

Rating: 4 out of 5.

My Thoughts:

What I Loved: As a child, I have VERY fond memories of Where the Sidewalk Ends by Shel Silverstein and reading this book with my daughter reminded me of Silverstein’s books. Each poem is short, silly, and comes with an illustration. I loved that my daughter laughed and giggled the way I did when I was young.

How I Felt: These poems were perfect for a child. They were a big gross sometimes talking about boogers and other things kids find hilarious. They were easy to understand and they were short, which I feel is really important for a little one. Poems spanned only one page and were easy to understand. Each poem is a stand-alone, so my daughter had fun just flipping through the book, finding an illustration that interested her, and we would read that one.

To Read or Not To Read: This is a good book for a elementary school child with easy to understand poems. I would not recommend this as a book that a child reads to themselves as the reading level would be a bit higher than early elementary.

Where To Find This Book:

Amazon

Goodreads

Mascot Books

Footnotes:

I received a copy of this advanced reader’s copy for free. I am leaving my review voluntarily.

All Amazon links on SheJustLovesBooks are affiliate links and I receive a small percentage of sales from the use of them. If you fall in love with a book because of my review and you want to buy, I would greatly appreciate the use of the link on my page.

#shejustlovesbooks #bookreview #bookblog #bathingkitty #kidslit #mascotbooks #lwlewis #kidsbooks #childrensbooks #kidspoems #poetry

The Dog That Would Not Bark by Shevelle Ford

Rating: 3 out of 5.

My Thoughts:

What I Loved: The little girl in this book is adorable. She loves her walks/stroller rides with her mom. My daughter connected with her immediately because she also likes to walk and she thought it was really great that the little girl did too!

How I Felt: The writing was very nice, and the story was easy to read, but I struggled with the rating of this book. The dog in the story is wearing a shock collar, which is why it won’t bark. The book never calls it that, but it’s clear that the collar is a shock collar. The dog cannot bark because of this and is always quiet on the walks. I just wasn’t quite sure of the lesson that I was trying to teach my child while reading this. My daughter had questions about what the collar was and I spent some time explaining it to her, but overall, I just did not know why this was a topic in a child’s book.

To Read or Not To Read: If you have a child that loves animals, this would be an enjoyable book for them, as in the end, the collar is removed and the child gets to hear the dog bark.

What’s This Book About Anyway?

A little girl and her mom go for walks each day. One day her mother takes a different route and they pass a dog behind a gated yard. The dog does not bark and the little girl questions why. The mother explains that the collar the dog wears does not allow him to bark. Each day they pass the dog and the little girl wants to hear the dog bark. Finally, one day as they pass, the owner has the dog on the sidewalk and the collar is removed. The little girl finally gets to hear the dog bark!

Where To Find This Book:

Amazon

Goodreads

Mascot Books

Footnotes:

I received a copy of this advanced reader’s copy for free. I am leaving my review voluntarily.

All Amazon links on SheJustLovesBooks are affiliate links and I receive a small percentage of sales from the use of them. If you fall in love with a book because of my review and you want to buy, I would greatly appreciate the use of the link on my page.

#shejustlovesbooks #bookreview #bookblog

The Truth About Wind by Hazel Hutchins

Rating: 5 out of 5.

My Thoughts:

What I Loved AND How I Felt (because they are super mixed together today:

The child in this story sneaks his arm through the fence and takes a toy. He kind of knows it was someone else’s, but it was also just on the ground. The evolution of this story was amazing. He’s elated about his new toy, Wind. They talk and play and love every second. However, as time goes on, Wind becomes less and less playful, showing just EXACTLY how guilt starts to eat away at you.

The way the story unfolded was perfect for a child to hear and be given a visual of the results of doing something you know was wrong and not saying anything to anyone. It starts to chip at your happiness until you know you must do the right thing. Bravo for this book!

To Read or Not To Read:

The Truth about Wind is perfect for a pre-k to middle elementary child. It is easy for a young reader to understand and has illustrations to keep them interested. It’s perfect for daycares, schools, libraries, and home!

What’s This Book About Anyway?

Jesse sees a pull toy horse on the other side of his fence. He decides to reach out and pull it through….and now it is his! Only, is it really? Does taking something make it yours? He plays and plays with his new toy, Wind and the have the best time together. Except that as time goes on, Wind becomes less and less playful. He begins to talk to Jesse less and less. Jesse begins to see “LOST” signs around, but he pretends they are there, that Wind is really his. He finally realizes that he must return Wind to the correct owner, and his guilt is lifted.

Where to Find This Book:

The Truth about Wind publishes on March 10, 2020

Amazon

Google Books

Footnotes:

I was provided an advanced readers copy of this book for free. I am leaving my review voluntarily.

#shejustlovesbooks #thetruthaboutwind #hazelhutchins #kidslit #kidsbooks #childrensbooks #bookreview #bookblog

Do Doodlebugs Doodle? by Corinne Demas and Artemis Roehrig

A book of Amazing Insect Facts

Rating: 5 out of 5.

My Thoughts:

What I Loved: I loved that each bug is introduced with a silly idea such as “Do waterbugs take baths?” The next page then tells you “No!” and then gives you really interesting things that this bug DOES do.

How I Felt: I was just the tiniest bit grossed out by some of the things these bugs do, however, my son was fascinated by each fact. The end of the book has a real picture of each bug and a bit more information. We had to carefully read through that part as well, as he loved it!

To Read or Not To Read: This book is perfect for kids that love bugs! The cartoon story is fun and interesting and the end section with additional information was great! Age appropriate for pre-K through middle elementary.

What’s This Book About Anyway?

Do Doodlebugs Doodle? asks a very silly question about each insect, and then tells you NO, that bug does not do that. It does however, do this. The facts were very interesting and made for a fun read!

Where to Find This Book:

Amazon

Goodreads

Author’s Website

Footnotes:

I received an advance review copy of this book for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily.

#shejustlovesbooks #shejustlovesbooksforkids #kidslit #childrensbook #kidsbook #booksirens #dodoodlebugsdoodle #corinnedemas #artemisroehring #bookblog #bookreview

Bug Hunt by Tom Story

Rating: 4 out of 5.

My Thoughts:

What I Loved: I loved the little girl in this story. She is clearly so fascinated by bugs and just wants to see them, but they keep getting away from her!

How I Felt: I wasn’t sure if my daughter would be willing to read this book with all the creepy-crawlies in it, but the artwork was well done and she was interested! I got a bit nervous at the end of the book when the wasp chases her, but the author ended that part of the story so well. The wasp ends up being friends with her, which we all know is very out of character for wasps, so this little girl clearly found a special one!

To Read or Not To Read: This is a great book for kids with a love for insects! The writing is perfect for Pre-K to early elementary.

What’s This Book About Anyway?

A little girl wants to go on a bug hunt. She’s got all of her bug hunting gear: the clothes, bug container, and her bug book. She finds lots of insects, but she can’t seem to capture any of them. They keep getting away. She finally finds the wasp, but it chases her! She manages to capture it without getting stung and makes friends with it. Showing the wasp her adorable book, she calms him down and lets him out so that they can hang out together.

Where to Find This Book:

Amazon

Goodreads

Author’s Website

Footnotes:

I received an advance review copy of this book for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily.

#shejustlovesbooks #shejustlovesbooksforkids #booksirens #bughunt #tomstory #kidslit #kidsbook #childrensbook #bookreview #bookblog

Hush Up and Hibernate by Sandra Markle

Howard McWilliam (Illustrator)

Rating: 5 out of 5.

My Thoughts:

What I Loved: The illustrations in this book were beautiful and thoughtful. The artwork felt so finished, you could be a part of the story and it was wonderful. I provided an image below so that you can see the colors and how well each section was created. It was excellent!

This copyrighted page is taken from Hush Up and Hibernate by Sandra Markle.

How I Felt: Oh I felt for this mama bear! She just wants to go to sleep for the winter, but Baby Bear is pulling out all the stops to stay up. The mama bear’s reactions are perfect and I felt myself connecting to her frustration and exhaustion. My favorite part was the last line in the story when she thinks she’s gotten him to sleep and he sits up and asks if it’s spring yet! Oh I giggled! After the story is finished, the author has added a section about bears and their hibernation routines, which my daughter and I found to be a wonderful addition to the book!

To Read or Not To Read: This is a great book for young preschoolers through early elementary school. The pictures are bright and help to tell the story and its just right for that age.

What’s This Book About Anyway?

It’s time to hibernate for the winter. Mama Bear is ready, but Baby Bear needs just one more snack. And then one more drink. And then so on and so forth. Mama Bear keeps her cool for a long time, but finally has to say “Enough”. This gets Baby Bear to realize it is time to sleep….but can he go to sleep?

Where to Find This Book:

Amazon

Goodreads

Author’s Website

Footnotes:

I received an advanced reader’s copy of this book for free. I am providing my honest review freely.

#shejustlovesbooks #shejustlovesbooksforkids #kidslit #childrensbooks #kidsbooks #bookreview #bookblog #hushupandhibernate #

On Gull Beach by Jane Yolen

Rating: 4 out of 5.

My Thoughts:

What I Loved: At the end of this book, there is a section that shows the animals and that were featured in the story. It was a wonderful connection between the cartoon illustrations and the real-life animal. My daughter made me read that section twice because she loved it so much!

How I Felt: This was a somewhat short book without an enormous plot, however, it was very impactful. The boy that is trying to get the star fish works so hard to save it, and I did not realize it was still alive! At the end, he is able to return it to the ocean, and I was so pleased. It was a good lesson about doing the right thing for another.

To Read or Not to Read: Any child would enjoy this book. It’s good for pre-k through early elementary. The section in the back showing the real animals would make a great discussion for a classroom.

What’s This Book About Anyway?

A young boy finds a star fish on the beach. As he goes to pick it up, a seagull swoops down and snatches it from him. The boy works so hard, struggling with the seagull and his seagull friends to save this star fish. During this adventure, the boy encounters a variety of birds and crabs, as well as those pesky seagulls. He is able to save the star fish, which is very lovingly returns to the water.

Where to Find This Book:

Cornell Lab Publishing Group donates 35% of net proceeds from the sale of their titles directly to the Cornell Lab to support projects such as children’s educational and community programs.

Amazon

Goodreads

Author’s Links:

Author’s Website

Goodreads

Facebook

Footnotes:

I received an advanced reader’s copy of this book for free. I am leaving my review voluntarily.

#booksirens #shejustlovesbooks #ongullbeach #janeyolen #kidslit #childrenslit #kidsbooks #childrensbooks #bookreview #bookblog

Giracula by Caroline Watkins

Rating: 5 out of 5.

My Thoughts:

What I Loved: The idea of a giraffe becoming a vampire, but loving sweets is adorable! I loved that he’s a bit confused, but is never scary for a child.

How I Felt: Giracula is just a poor giraffe that was in the wrong place at the wrong time. He’s a bit sad that he can’t go back to just being a giraffe, and my daughter was sad about that. However, when he finds his new friend that can help him, my daughter was so excited and happy. It made her enjoy the book and want to read it again!

The illustrations in this book are cute and well though out. The lanky giraffe made some of the illustrations all the more fun, with his long limbs and neck, the artwork could be a bit more exaggerated.

To Read or Not To Read: This book is not scary at all, so it works well for any child. The writing is perfect for pre-k through middle elementary.

What’s This Book About Anyway?

Giracula was just a normal giraffe when a group of hungry bats bite him, turning him into a vampire giraffe. He flies off into the night and lands in front of a bakery. He’s confused, as he is taken over by an overwhelming urge for sweets! He breaks into the bakery and eats everything in sight. As he continues in this way, he is caught by the townspeople who run away in fear. All except one little girl who knows just how to make things right.

Where to Find This Book:

Amazon

Goodreads

Footnotes:

I received an advance review copy of this book for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily.

#shejustlovesbooks #shejustlovesbooksforkids #giracula #carolinewatkins #booksirens #kidslit #kidsbooks #childrensbook #bookreview #bookblog

Randal the Elephant by Ciara Gavin

Rating: 5 out of 5.

My Thoughts:

What I Loved: The illustrations in this book were amazing! They were soft and colorful and made the reading experience so much better. They really filled the story out for the reader.

How I Felt: I was happy with the message of this book. You can be anything you want to be and it’s ok to think you want to be one thing, try it, and decide it is not right for you. For our children, giving them the courage to try new things is important and letting them know that it’s ok to not succeed at something is perfect. I loved Randal’s determination to be an elephant and his letters home were cute and made my daughter and I giggle. Randal’s adventure with the elephants wasn’t quite what he thought it would be, but we enjoyed watching him try.

To Read or Not To Read: This book is perfect for a pre-K to middle elementary school. It’s a good story for every child with a message that they can understand.

What’s This Book About Anyway?

Randal is an otter, but decides that he would like to be an elephant. His friends and family are very supportive of his decision and send him off on his journey. Randal writes letters home that make it sound like he’s having a wonderful time, but you can also read between the lines to see that it is not quite the experience he thought it would be.

Randal discovers that it is ok to want to be something and then discover that it is not quite right for him. His friends were supportive of his choices, and the end of the book shows how he doesn’t give up on finding something that is right for him.

Where to Find This Book:

Amazon Goodreads

Footnotes:

I received an advance review copy of this book for free, and I am leaving this review voluntarily.

#shejustlovesbooks #shejustlovesbooksforkids #randaltheelephant #kidslit #kidsbooks #childrensbooks #bookreview #bookblog #ciaragavin

Who Named Their Pony Macaroni? by Marilyn Singer

About the Book:

Who Named Their Pony Macaroni? by Marilyn Singer

Illustrated by Ryan McAmis

Published: October 1, 2019

Publisher: Disney-Hyperion

Available formats: Hardcover, eBook

Page Count: 48

A family of mice. A runaway goat.

A mischievous snake.

A shocking parrot.

A pardoned turkey.

A pampered raccoon.

A ghostbusting dog.

A celebrity cow.

The White House housed more than presidents and First Families–who could forget the furry, scaly, feathered friends who impressed the press, guarded their charges, and kept them company through all the ups and downs of their respective terms?

Marilyn Singer’s compelling poems will delight readers with stories of the creatures who sat beside our country’s leaders, as she draws intriguing connections between the animals and the administrations they accompanied. Mixed-media illustrations by Ryan McAmis lend humor and vivacity, and detailed back matter explores each president’s pet history in more depth.

Where to Find This Book:

Find it at: Goodreads, Amazon, Kindle, B&N, iBooks, Kobo, Book Depository

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About the Author:

Marilyn Singer was born in the Bronx (New York City) on October 3, 1948 and lived most of her early life in N. Massapequa (Long Island), NY. She attended Queens College, City University of New York, and for her junior year, Reading University, England. She holds a B.A. in English from Queens and an M.A. in Communications from New York University.

In 1974, after teaching English in New York City high schools for several years, she began to write – initially film notes, catalogues, teacher’s guides and film strips. Then, one day, when she was sitting in the Brooklyn Botanic Garden, she penned a story featuring talking insect characters she’d made up when she was eight. Encouraged by the

responses she got, she wrote more stories and in 1976 her first book, The Dog Who Insisted He Wasn’t, was published by E.P.Dutton & Co.

Since then, Marilyn has published over seventy books for children and young adults. Her genres are many and varied, including realistic novels, fantasies, non-fiction, fairy tales, picture books, mysteries and poetry. She likes writing many different kinds of books because it’s challenging and it keeps her from getting bored. She has won several Children’s Choice and Parents’ Choice Awards, as well as the following: the Creature Carnival, Lee Bennett Hopkins Poetry Award Honor Book, 2005; I Believe in Water: Twelve Brushes with Religion, New York Public Library’s “Best Books for the Teen Age,” 2001; Stay True: Short Stories for Strong Girls, Popular Paperbacks for Young Adults, 2000 (YALSA); On the Same Day in March, Booklist’s Top Ten Science Books of 2000; NCSS-CBC Notable Book, 2000; Deal with a Ghost, finalist, YA category, Edgar Award, 1998; It Can’t Hurt Forever, Maud Hart Lovelace Award, 1983; The Course of True Love Never Did Run Smooth, ALA Best Book for Young Adults, 1983; Turtle in July, NCTE Notable, N.Y.Times Best Illustrated and Time Magazine Best Children’s Books of 1989; Turtle in July was also a Reading Rainbow review book.

Marilyn currently lives in Brooklyn, NY, with her husband Steve; their standard poodle Oggi, a cousin of their beloved and recently departed poodle Easy, seen in the home page photo; a cat named August ; two collared doves named Jubilee and Holiday; and a starling named Darling. Her interests include dog training, reading, hiking, bird-watching, gardening, meditation, playing computer adventure games and going to the movies and the theatre. She’s also a major Star Trek fan.

Author’s Links: Website | Goodreads | Facebook